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The ACLU goes on to say that while the collection of this private information by the government is in itself an unacceptable invasion of privacy, how they use the information is even more problematic to the point of abuse. Otherwise harmless data gets placed on a variety of watch lists, with harsh consequences. Innocent individuals are prevented from boarding planes, are unable to obtain certain types of jobs, have their bank accounts frozen and find themselves repeatedly questioned by authorities without knowing why. Once the government has such information, it can widely share it and retain it indefinitely American Civil Liberties Organization. The rules regarding who has access to this surveillance information and how it can be used have changed and changed again in secret without the public ever becoming aware. The government can also use it to justify changing rules or even breaking laws as it did after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. For example, after 9/11 surveillance data was used to indicate potential terrorists so that the CIA could capture them and obtain information that would prevent other terrorist attacks. Despite it being against international law and the law of the U. S. to torture anyone for any purpose Restatement of the Law Third, the CIA was known to have used torture to obtain information and confessions from a number of individuals after 9/11. Furthermore, of 119 people held in custody and tortured by the C.

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“Alarms aren’t just for life safety anymore and people aren’t looking for just security. A customer will ask, ‘do you do thermostats?’ because they want to control the thermostat with the alarm system. We are walking into a sale with a life leisure system where before we walked in just as the alarm guy. My title at the grocery store isn’t the ‘alarm guy’ anymore. It’s ‘that’s the guy who did my smart house. ’”That isn’t to say dealers don’t view them as competition, however. For the second consecutive year SDM’s Industry Forecast Study cited DIY security providers as their greatest competition in the coming year, with 33 percent of respondents choosing DIY companies as their No. 1 competitive threat. National/global security companies followed, at 28 percent of respondents. However, wireless phone providers/broadband providers fell to 7 percent as a perceived threat, down from 11 percent last year. In all cases, it seems dealers and manufacturers alike view competition as untapped opportunity, a philosophy that also factors into the healthy optimism this year.